Liberia

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Flag of Liberia Liberia
Information
Language: English
Capital: Monrovia
Population: 3,476,608
Currency: Liberian Dollar
Hitchability: <rating country='lb' />
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<map lat="6.7644261817079" lng="-9.2148687500624" zoom="6" view="0" float="right" />


Liberia is a country in Western Africa, bordered by Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Côte d'Ivoire. As of 2011 it seems to be relatively calm in Liberia.

Cities

Monrovia, Robertsport, Greenville, Harper, Paynesville

Just the same as most other West African countries, Liberia's roads are mostly made of dirt and sand and full of potholes. This makes travelling take a very long time and be pretty uncomfortable. Rainy season is a BIG problem when trying to get anywhere overland in Liberia. The road from the border of Sierra Leone towards Monrovia is fully developed, but the rest of Liberia's roads aren't. They are currently (as of 2013) developing the road from Monrovia towards Ganta in the north. To get from Monrovia to Ivory Coast, you must first go to Ganta in the north, then take the south-east direction road to Harper, as there is no coastal road. Harper is the only current border which is open to Ivory Coast. If you do not go this way, then you will have to re-enter Guinea in order to reach Ivory Coast.

Due to the simple direction of roads in Liberia, hitching here is uncomplicated. Stand on the road just outside of any town and wait for a ride here. If you do not want to pay, make sure you tell them you have no money. Some will leave, some will take you. Taxis will already be filled at the taxi parks in the closest big town, so don't expect to be able to get a ride with one if you are outside the town or in a small village. Due to the small amount of traffic in some areas, sometimes you will wait up to an hour or so before you see any vehicle. Likelihood is that the first one you see will stop for you if they have space.

Sleeping

If hitchhiking, locals will almost always offer you a place to stay for the night in their homes. Also, if stopping in small villages and towns along your route, try asking a local for a place to sleep for the night. 100% of the time that Kimmie did this, she was offered a place by all without any hesitation.